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    How to Distinguish 6 Different Kinds of “String of Hearts”

    4 min read

    String of Hearts, variegated string of hearts, string of hearts plant, string of hearts care, string of hearts variegata, how to propagate string of hearts, silver glory string of hearts

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    It’s normal for gardeners and botanists to develop different varieties of succulents: the Echeveria family, for example, has hundreds of different varieties! For the ever-popular String of Hearts, this is no different. 

    About the Succulent

    The String of Hearts succulent is best known for its heart-shaped leaves, hence the name. These flat, bright green, and sometimes silvery leaves sit upon long stems, and the plant itself is often used as a hanging succulent or trailing plant. Spruce up your home with a pet-safe ivy-esque pop of green by placing your String of Hearts on a high windowsill or shelf, and let the leaves trail down to the ground for its full effect.

    Varieties

    There are several varieties of the Ceropegia Woodii, all of which are identifiable based on their leaf shape and coloration. For the most part, these varieties are all non-toxic and have the same general care needs. 

    1. Regular String of Hearts

    Your standard String of Hearts is identifiable by its heart-shaped leaves that are deep green with pale green veins. This variation of the plant features darker, red stems, and on occasion, the underside or edges of your leaves may appear reddish as well.

    2. String of Hearts “Silver Glory”

    The “Silver Glory” variety of your String of Hearts looks strikingly similar to the original plant. However, this variety has lily pad-shaped leaves that aren’t pointed on the bottom. The leaves are also a paler green, with deep green edges.

    3. Variegated String of Hearts

    Variegated String of Hearts succulent looks the same as the original Ceropegia Woodii, but it features much more vibrant pinks and violets in the leaves and stem. A more colorful variation of the String of Hearts, this offshoot has pink or reddish leaves with green centers.

    String of Hearts, variegated string of hearts, string of hearts plant, string of hearts care, string of hearts variegata, how to propagate string of hearts, silver glory string of hearts
    A Variegated String of Hearts succulent features much more vibrant pinks and violets in the leaves and stem

    4. String of Arrows

    The next variety on our list, the String of Arrows, is known for its sharper leaves that look more like triangles than hearts. While this succulent isn’t as colorful as its other family members, the String of Arrows has lovely emerald leaves with pale veins and dark green or brown stems.

    5. String of Spades

    The String of Spades may appear similar to the String of Arrows, but this succulent has darker leaves and thus more contrast between the deep green body of the leaf and the pale green veins. This succulent’s leaves are similar to a heart shape but look more like a spade from a suit of cards. These leaves also sit flat on their stem, while most String of Hearts varieties feature leaves that curve outward from their stems.

    6. String of Needles

    Toxic but not deadly, the String of Needles variation is the only succulent on this list that can cause significant damage when ingested. Common poisoning symptoms from eating parts of the String of Needles include nausea, vomiting, lightheadedness, and headaches.

    Aside from its toxicity, the String of Needles is highly recognizable due to its long, pointy leaves. 

    General Care for Your String of Hearts

    The Ceropegia Woodii family all have similar care needs, so consulting a guide for any variety of this succulent works well as a reference. 

    1. Light

    For light, you’ll need bright, indirect sunlight. While this type of succulent may love bright light and hot temperatures, its leaves are still delicate and will burn under direct afternoon sunlight. If you plan on keeping your String of Hearts indoors, a window that receives indirect light works best. Consider placing your pot toward a south or west-facing window for best results.

    String of Hearts, variegated string of hearts, string of hearts plant, string of hearts care, string of hearts variegata, how to propagate string of hearts, silver glory string of hearts
    Your String of Hearts will need bright, indirect sunlight

    2. Water

    For water, your String of Hearts needs light, occasional watering, best done via a good soak every two or three weeks using the bottom-watering technique. Unlike most succulents, the String of Hearts isn’t particularly susceptible to water damage on its leaves, but we still recommend keeping them dry as best as you can. 

    3. Soil

    Since this variety of succulent is particularly susceptible to root rot, it’s best to avoid letting excess water soak in your pot. Soil with high levels of drainage, like a cactus mix, are best here, but you can also modify a traditional potting soil by adding a little bit of perlite to improve drainage. In addition, using a pot made from a porous material like concrete, terracotta, or unglazed ceramic can further improve drainage.

    String of Hearts, variegated string of hearts, string of hearts plant, string of hearts care, string of hearts variegata, how to propagate string of hearts, silver glory string of hearts
    It’s best to avoid letting excess water soak in your pot.

     

    Propagating your String of Hearts

    The String of Hearts and its variations are great beginner plants for learning to propagate. Since these succulents have long stems, trimming a cutting big enough to propagate a new plant is easy. Use a pair of clean, sharp scissors to trim the plant’s stem three to six inches long, remove the lower leaves from your cutting to provide extra room for roots to grow, and wait a day for the cuttings to callous over. Then, propagate using your preferred propagation method!

     

    See more about Using Hydrogen Peroxide with Succulents

    USING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE WITH SUCCULENTS

     

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