Code MD24 for 17% off all orders

OCTOBER 2023 SUCCULENT SUBSCRIPTION BOX CARE GUIDE

3 min read

OCTOBER 2023 SUCCULENT SUBSCRIPTION BOX CARE GUIDE

0 Comments

Our October box featuring Green Jelly Bean, Tiger's Jaw CrassulaEcheveria Perle Von Nurnberg, Graptosedum California Sunset, and Tillandsia Fuchsii.

1. Green Jelly Bean

 Sedum Pachyphyllum, also known as Green Jelly Bean Sedum or Sedum Pork and Beans, is a cute succulent with short chubby silvery green leaves that have red tips when grown in full sun.

 It has a shrubbing habit and can grow bushes up to 1 foot tall. It may become leggy with age. The leaves and stems can be easily propagated.

 In summer, it produces clusters of bright yellow flowers.

 Full Sun. 

Water deeply when soil is dry to the touch, then let drain completely.

Soil that is well aerated is best suited. 

2. Tiger's Jaw Crassula

 Faucaria Tigrina, also known as Tiger's Jaw Crassula, is a small succulent clump-forming perennial. The leaves are thick, triangular, and light green. They can turn purple when received plenty of sun exposure. On the margins of the leaves, there are upright soft, white (up to 10) teeth in opposite pairs that look like an animal’s jaw.

Tiger's Jaw Crassula produces large silky yellow flowers.

Full sun.

Well-Drained, Porous, Gritty. Optimal pH is around 6.0 (slightly acidic).

Water thoroughly when soil is dry to the touch, then let drain completely. Avoid letting water sit for too long in the soil to prevent rot and fungal diseases. Reduce watering in the winter.

 Average summer temperatures from 65ºF/18ºC to 70ºF/21ºC are ideal. In winter, it can survive temperatures as low as 50ºF/10ºC.

 Feed once with a controlled-release fertilizer at the beginning of the growing season.

 You can propagate Tiger’s Jaw Crassula by division, offsets or leaf cuttings. The easiest way is to propagate from a single leaf: put the leaf in a succulent or cacti mix, then cover until it sprouts.

3. Echeveria Perle Von Nurnberg 

This succulent is a beautifully colored Echeveria Perle Von Nurnberg. The plant is a hybrid of E. Gibbiflora v. Metallica and E. Potosina.

 These plants are excellent for windowsill culture or as color accents in rock gardens or dish gardens. These make super colorful favors. Create your own container garden or centerpiece using the very popular succulents or buy in bulk to use these as wedding or party favors.

 Orange. Summer into Fall.

 Full Sun, Partial Sun, bright light with ample airflow.

Water thoroughly when soil is dry to the touch. Avoid letting water sit for too long in the rosette to prevent rot and fungal diseases.

Porous soil with adequate drainage.

 Protect from frost.

 Dead leaves should be removed from the plant as soon as possible to ward off pests.

Generally non-toxic to humans and animals

4. Graptosedum 'California Sunset' 

 Graptosedum ‘California Sunset’ is a fun succulent with rosy orange leaves forming small rosettes similar to those of Echeverias. The stems tend to grow long and leggy. New growth has a grayish-green color but the rosy orange hue will be intensified by drought and cool winter temperatures.

 In spring and summer, it produces clusters of white star-shaped flowers.

Full Sun.

Porous and well-Drained.

More regularly in the summer. Minimal water required in the winter. Let the soil dry completely after each watering.

 Feed once at the beginning of the growing season (in the spring).

Generally non-toxic to humans and animals.

5. Tillandsia Fuchsii

Tillandsia Fuchsii, native to Mexico and Guatemala, is a delicate air plant with tiny thread-like leaf blades. These leaves are silvery pale green; the flowers are vibrant violet when in bloom. After the plant blooms, it produces offsets and starts to form a clump. Fuchsii usually grows symmetrically to form a perfect sphere.

Bright light.

No soil is needed. Sand, sea glass, rocks, pebbles & bark chip can be used instead of soil.

Mist your Fuchsii a few times per week. You can also soak the plant in a bowl of water for a minimum of an hour every 1 or 2 weeks (because the fine leaf blades might not absorb enough water from misting). Give it a little shake off afterwards to eliminate excess water and make sure water doesn't collect in the bottom leaves to prevent rot.

See more about WHY IS MY SUCCULENT STEM DRIED OUT?

WHY IS MY SUCCULENT STEM DRIED OUT?

For Types of Succulents Care guide. Read more information here.

And get a free plant when your friends make an order. Sign up here!

Learn more about how to nurture and enjoy many gorgeous succulents and clever decoration tips with our newsletter. Let's sign up!

Recommended Items



Back to Top