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The news is out! Our July subscription box is featuring 4 varieties of Haworthia succulents: Haworthia Window, Haworthia African Pearls, Haworthia Zebra, and Haworthia Cuspidata. This article will give you more information on each of these plants and instructions on how to care for them as they become the new additions to your succulent collection.

Succulent Subscription Box July 2018

WHAT IS HAWORTHIA?

Haworthia is a genus of small succulent plants that are indigenous to Southern Africa. Together with aloes, Haworthia plants are in the subfamily of Asphodeloideae. They usually have firm, tough, and fleshy leaves in dark green color. However, some species can be softer and contain leaf windows with translucent panels which facilitate the photosynthesis process. Most Haworthia plants grow small rosettes of leaves from 4 cm (2 in) to 20 cm (8 in) and they tend to have small white flowers in summer.


Temperature

Haworthia succulents prefer warm weather. Temperatures in the spring and fall are optimal for them. They can survive cool winter but will not do well under 40°F (4°C).


Sun exposure

Bright, filtered light and ample airflow are recommended. The lack of sunlight can cause Haworthias to etiolate and lose their vibrant colors. Newly acquired tender plants or plants that have been grown indoors need to be gradually introduced to sunlight to avoid fatal sunburn.


Water

Water thoroughly only when the soil is dry to the touch (about every 2 weeks). Never let your succulents sit in water and do NOT water on the leaves. Don't forget to learn how to water your succulents the right way.

You can water more often if you live in areas with hot weather because your soil will dry out faster. Reduce watering in winter because the succulent can lose its roots if the soil stays cold and wet for an extended amount of time.


Propagation and Soil

You can propagate Haworthia plants by using a sharp knife to separate the offsets from the mother plant. Try cutting as close to the mother plant as possible to make sure that the offset has some roots attached to it. Let the offsets callous over for a day or two to prevent root rot and pot them in some succulent soil mix. It’s important to provide porous soil with adequate drainage. Check out 
the perfect ratio for potting soil mix here.


Fertilizer

Feed sparingly with a weak fertilizer solution to promote plant growth. You can use an all-purpose fertilizer diluted to 50% of the recommended dose to feed your Haworthia once at the beginning of the growing season (in the spring or fall).

 

Haworthia Window

Haworthia Window, also known as Cathedral Window Haworthia, is a drought-tolerant evergreen succulent with rosettes up to 4 inches (10 cm) in diameter. Its pale green leaves are fleshy, bulbous, and tender with dark stripes running across the length of each leaf and turning translucent at the tip. This species has flowers that are white or light pink with brown-green veins growing from 8 inches (20 cm) tall inflorescence. 

Haworthia Window is a popular houseplant because it is super easy to grow and low maintenance. Whether you grow it indoors or outdoors, the growing conditions for this plant remain the same.

Haworthia Window for Sale


Light
: Bright, indirect light, partial shade

Soil: Porous, well-drained potting mix with sand, pumice or decomposed granite

Water: Water only when soil is dry to the touch. Let drain completely after each watering.

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b to 11b: from 25 °F (−3.9 °C) to 50 °F (+10 °C).

 

Haworthia African Pearls

Haworthia African Pearls, also known as Haworthia Reinwardtii or Zebra Wart, is one of the most striking Haworthia with narrow pointy leaves marked with bumpy white spotty stripes. The tightly packed leaves are arranged in a spiral pattern, forming columnar rosettes up to 8 inches tall. Haworthia Reinwardtii produces offsets freely to form a mat. In spring, the mature rosettes produce tiny, tubular, white or pale pink flowers on thin, long stems high above the foliage.


Haworthia African Pearls


Photo via flickr.com by Esin İşcan


Light: Bright light, but not direct sunlight

Soil: Use a cactus mix or very fast-draining potting soil mixed with sand

Water: Water deeply when soil is dry and let water drain out completely

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F)


Haworthia Zebra

Haworthia Zebra Haworthia Fasciata 'Zebra Haworthia" is one of the most popular Haworthia species. Its leaves are thin, and dark green with horizontal white ridges that resemble zebra striping. Zebra Haworthia is often grown as indoor plant because of its attractive appearance and low maintenance. It produces offsets freely, and the offsets can be propagated easily. The Zebra Plant flowers are small tubular white or pink flowers growing from a very thin kind of stem. It rarely blooms though and when it does, the flowers only last for a few days.

Haworthia Zebra Plant


Light: Bright light, but not direct sunlight

Soil: Use a cactus mix or very fast-draining potting soil mixed with sand

Water: Water only when soil feels dry to the touch and then drain completely. Never let the plant sit in water.

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F)


Haworthia Cuspidata

Haworthia Cuspidata is a strong and pretty hardy succulents. It forms star-like shaped rosettes up to 4 inches in diameter. Also called "Star Window Plant", it has light green or dark grey-green leaves with pointy and translucent areas near the tips. It grows offsets freely and hence can be grown as a ground cover. In spring, it produces small white flowers on thin long stems.

Haworthia Cuspidata


Light
: Bright light, but not direct sunlight

Soil: Use a cactus mix or very fast-draining potting soil mixed with sand

Water: Water only when soil feels dry to the touch and then drain completely. Never let the plant sit in water.

Hardiness: Zone 10 (30°F)



You can refer to this Plant Hardiness Zone Map from USDA to determine which zone your area belongs to.


USDA Hardiness Zone Succulents
Image source: USDA


We hope this complete care guide for Haworthia plants will be helpful for you when you get your new Subscription Box this month. You can expect to receive from 1 to 4 of the plants featured, depending on the subscription plan you chose. Do not hesitate to contact us with any questions you might have.


Collectors, enjoy your lovely Succulents Boxes!


Info sources:
World of Succulents

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